Friday, April 4, 4:00–8:30pmSaturday, April 5, 11:00am–4:00pmWhat Now?: Collaboration & Collectivity The New School, New York CityFree admission with RSVP; details forthcoming.

What Now? 2014 is a two-day symposium organized by Art in General in collaboration with the Vera List Center for Art and Politics. This launches a new series of annual conferences, called to investigate issues arising in the field of contemporary art. This year’s conference is dedicated to Collaboration and Collectivity and organized around three sessions spanning Friday and Saturday, with a keynote lecture on Friday evening, delivered by Charles Esche.

In the spirit of philosopher Hannah Arendt, who taught at The New School for many years, the symposium examines collaboration through a politics of place—how the way in which we live and work together directly creates the political landscape we inhabit. In Arendt’s words, “To live together in the world means essentially that a world of things is between those who have it in common, as a table is located between those who sit around it; the world, like every in-between, relates and separates men at the same time.”The symposium comprises three sessions: Collective Authorship, Collective Bargaining and Collective (Dis)engagement.

Friday, April 4, 4:00–8:30pm
Saturday, April 5, 11:00am–4:00pm
What Now?: Collaboration & Collectivity
The New School, New York City

Free admission with RSVP; details forthcoming.

What Now? 2014 is a two-day symposium organized by Art in General in collaboration with the Vera List Center for Art and Politics. This launches a new series of annual conferences, called to investigate issues arising in the field of contemporary art. This year’s conference is dedicated to Collaboration and Collectivity and organized around three sessions spanning Friday and Saturday, with a keynote lecture on Friday evening, delivered by Charles Esche.

In the spirit of philosopher Hannah Arendt, who taught at The New School for many years, the symposium examines collaboration through a politics of place—how the way in which we live and work together directly creates the political landscape we inhabit. In Arendt’s words, “To live together in the world means essentially that a world of things is between those who have it in common, as a table is located between those who sit around it; the world, like every in-between, relates and separates men at the same time.”
The symposium comprises three sessions: Collective Authorship, Collective Bargaining and Collective (Dis)engagement.

Nothingness and the Aesthetics of Having Been | ashon crawley

feltevents:

Having been said to be nothing, this is a love letter written to we who have been, and are today still, said to have nothing. And to a tradition of such nothingness. This is a love letter to a love tradition, a tradition which emerges from within, carries and promises nothingness as the centrifugal, centripetal, centrifugitive force released against, and thus is a critical intervention into, the known world, the perniciously fictive worlds of our making. Some might call this fictive world “real.” Some might call this fictive world reality. Some might call this fictive world the project of western civilization, complete with its brutally violent capacity for rapacious captivity. This is a love letter to a tradition of the ever overflowing, excessive nothingness that protects itself, that with the breaking of families, of flesh, makes known and felt, the refusal of being destroyed. There is something in such nothingness that is not, but still ever excessively was, is and is yet to come. This is a love letter written against notions of ascendancy, written in favor of the social rather than modern liberal subject’s development. What emerges from the zone of nothingness, from the calculus of the discarded? If something makes itself felt, known, from the zone of those of us said to be and have nothing, then the interrogation of what nothingness means is our urgent task.

March 14, 2014San Francisco Museum of Modern ArtArt can take the form of political and social activism, and activism often takes on specific, and sometimes surprising, visual forms. How is our broader visual culture shaped by activist practices that circulate in public space? How can we better understand forms of communication that take place under threat of war, revolution, or repression? What strategies can be deployed to transform our engagement with the built environment and broader ecologies? How do embedded social hegemonies, such as racism, figure in the larger efforts to engage with activism visually?
Photo credit: From left to right: Occupy Oakland, November 2, 2011; photo: Salvador Ingram; Carlos Motta, Deviations to Love # 7, 2013; courtesy Galeria Filomena Soares, Lisbon; Instituto de Visión, Bogotá; Y Gallery, New York; Zanele Muholi; Courtesy the artist and Stevenson, Cape Town and Johannesburg; Carmen Papalia, The Blind Field Shuttle, 2012; photo Jordan Reznick

March 14, 2014
San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

Art can take the form of political and social activism, and activism often takes on specific, and sometimes surprising, visual forms. How is our broader visual culture shaped by activist practices that circulate in public space? How can we better understand forms of communication that take place under threat of war, revolution, or repression? What strategies can be deployed to transform our engagement with the built environment and broader ecologies? How do embedded social hegemonies, such as racism, figure in the larger efforts to engage with activism visually?

Photo credit: From left to right: Occupy Oakland, November 2, 2011; photo: Salvador Ingram; Carlos Motta, Deviations to Love # 7, 2013; courtesy Galeria Filomena Soares, Lisbon; Instituto de Visión, Bogotá; Y Gallery, New York; Zanele Muholi; Courtesy the artist and Stevenson, Cape Town and Johannesburg; Carmen Papalia, The Blind Field Shuttle, 2012; photo Jordan Reznick

March 11, 2014Solomon R. Guggenheim MuseumParticipants: Leeza Ahmady, Thomas J. Berghuis, Melissa Chiu, Reem Fadda, Pablo León de la Barra, moderated by Alexandra MunroePresented as part of Asian Contemporary Art Week’s critical Dialogues in Contemporary Art series, and as a prelude to its ninth installment scheduled for fall, “Urgency and Relevance: A Curatorial Perspective” provides an insider’s view of contemporary art through the eyes of international practitioners working at the edge of advocacy and establishment. While representing current priorities in a landscape of new global initiatives, each curator will give voice to diverse practices within various museum models. As told through personal stories of discovery and illustrated by specific case studies, such dynamics as the formation of collections, engagement with living artists, representation of multiple communities, economics of cultural capital, and press of civic life are brought to light through curatorial work. 

Photo credit:The Otolith Group, “Communists Like Us” (still), 2006–10. Black-and-white video, with sound, 23:05 minutes, edition 2/5. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Guggenheim UBS MAP Purchase Fund 2012.163. © The Otolith Group.

March 11, 2014
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Participants: Leeza Ahmady, Thomas J. Berghuis, Melissa Chiu, Reem Fadda, Pablo León de la Barra, moderated by Alexandra Munroe

Presented as part of Asian Contemporary Art Week’s critical Dialogues in Contemporary Art series, and as a prelude to its ninth installment scheduled for fall, “Urgency and Relevance: A Curatorial Perspective” provides an insider’s view of contemporary art through the eyes of international practitioners working at the edge of advocacy and establishment. While representing current priorities in a landscape of new global initiatives, each curator will give voice to diverse practices within various museum models. As told through personal stories of discovery and illustrated by specific case studies, such dynamics as the formation of collections, engagement with living artists, representation of multiple communities, economics of cultural capital, and press of civic life are brought to light through curatorial work.

Photo credit:The Otolith Group, “Communists Like Us” (still), 2006–10. Black-and-white video, with sound, 23:05 minutes, edition 2/5. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Guggenheim UBS MAP Purchase Fund 2012.163. © The Otolith Group.

October 24, 2013-February 22, 2014Visibility Machines: Harun Farocki and Trevor PaglenCenter for Art, Design and Visual Culture
“Visibility Machines” explores the unique roles Harun Farocki and Trevor Paglen play as meticulous observers of the global military industrial complex. Investigating forms of military surveillance, espionage, war-making, and weaponry, Farocki and Paglen each examine the deceptive and clandestine ways in which military projects have deeply transformed, and politicized, our relationship to images and the realities they seem to represent. The exhibition initiates critical questions about the crucial part images play in revealing essential but largely concealed information, and places the oeuvres of Harun Farocki and Trevor Paglen within the broader cultural and historical developments of the media they are creatively working with, namely photography, film, and new media.

October 24, 2013-February 22, 2014
Visibility Machines: Harun Farocki and Trevor Paglen
Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture

“Visibility Machines” explores the unique roles Harun Farocki and Trevor Paglen play as meticulous observers of the global military industrial complex. Investigating forms of military surveillance, espionage, war-making, and weaponry, Farocki and Paglen each examine the deceptive and clandestine ways in which military projects have deeply transformed, and politicized, our relationship to images and the realities they seem to represent. The exhibition initiates critical questions about the crucial part images play in revealing essential but largely concealed information, and places the oeuvres of Harun Farocki and Trevor Paglen within the broader cultural and historical developments of the media they are creatively working with, namely photography, film, and new media.

  • October 18, 2013–January 5, 2014Making Space.40 Years of Video ArtMusée cantonal des Beaux-ArtsIn 1973 video celebrated its tenth anniversary, and Nam June Paik made what would become the cult tape of the history of video—Global Groove. That same year the Musée cantonal des Beaux-Arts, Lausanne, started its collection of videos by acquiring Limite E (1973), a work by Jean Otth. Since then, from experimenting with the medium to using it to record actions, from the TV set to projection, from the frontal relationship with viewers to their involvement in the installation space, video has developed in a number of radically different ways. Making Space sets out to cover forty years of video art in large strides, in the spaces opened up by the moving image, in a museum that has always given it a special place, both where the collection is concerned and in monographic exhibitions by major artists, from Bill Viola to Renée Green, by way of Bruce Nauman, Alfredo Jaar or indeed Nalini Malani.Making Space brings together works whose common denominator is the recording or reconstructing of the space that can be seen, the space inhabited by the artist’s body, and lastly the space enlivened by the presence of onlookers. 
With works by:Eija-Liisa Ahtila, Judith Albert, Francis Alÿs, Emmanuelle Antille, René Bauermeister, Dara Birnbaum, Paul Chan, Silvie & Chérif Defraoui, VALIE EXPORT, Dan Graham, Joan Jonas, Kim Sooja, Ana Mendieta, Bruce Nauman, Jean Otth, Nam June Paik, Anne-Julie Raccoursier, Pipilotti Rist, Anri Sala, Gerry Schum, Richard Serra, Salla Tykkä, Bill Viola Photo: Nam June Paik, Global Groove, 1973 (video still). Musée cantonal des Beaux-Arts de Lausanne. Acquisition 2013. Courtesy Studio Nam June Paik and EAI, New York
  • October 18, 2013–January 5, 2014Making Space.40 Years of Video ArtMusée cantonal des Beaux-ArtsIn 1973 video celebrated its tenth anniversary, and Nam June Paik made what would become the cult tape of the history of video—Global Groove. That same year the Musée cantonal des Beaux-Arts, Lausanne, started its collection of videos by acquiring Limite E (1973), a work by Jean Otth. Since then, from experimenting with the medium to using it to record actions, from the TV set to projection, from the frontal relationship with viewers to their involvement in the installation space, video has developed in a number of radically different ways. Making Space sets out to cover forty years of video art in large strides, in the spaces opened up by the moving image, in a museum that has always given it a special place, both where the collection is concerned and in monographic exhibitions by major artists, from Bill Viola to Renée Green, by way of Bruce Nauman, Alfredo Jaar or indeed Nalini Malani.Making Space brings together works whose common denominator is the recording or reconstructing of the space that can be seen, the space inhabited by the artist’s body, and lastly the space enlivened by the presence of onlookers. 
With works by:Eija-Liisa Ahtila, Judith Albert, Francis Alÿs, Emmanuelle Antille, René Bauermeister, Dara Birnbaum, Paul Chan, Silvie & Chérif Defraoui, VALIE EXPORT, Dan Graham, Joan Jonas, Kim Sooja, Ana Mendieta, Bruce Nauman, Jean Otth, Nam June Paik, Anne-Julie Raccoursier, Pipilotti Rist, Anri Sala, Gerry Schum, Richard Serra, Salla Tykkä, Bill Viola Photo: Nam June Paik, Global Groove, 1973 (video still). Musée cantonal des Beaux-Arts de Lausanne. Acquisition 2013. Courtesy Studio Nam June Paik and EAI, New York

October 18, 2013–January 5, 2014
Making Space.
40 Years of Video Art
Musée cantonal des Beaux-Arts

In 1973 video celebrated its tenth anniversary, and Nam June Paik made what would become the cult tape of the history of video—Global Groove. That same year the Musée cantonal des Beaux-Arts, Lausanne, started its collection of videos by acquiring Limite E (1973), a work by Jean Otth. 

Since then, from experimenting with the medium to using it to record actions, from the TV set to projection, from the frontal relationship with viewers to their involvement in the installation space, video has developed in a number of radically different ways. Making Space sets out to cover forty years of video art in large strides, in the spaces opened up by the moving image, in a museum that has always given it a special place, both where the collection is concerned and in monographic exhibitions by major artists, from Bill Viola to Renée Green, by way of Bruce Nauman, Alfredo Jaar or indeed Nalini Malani.

Making Space brings together works whose common denominator is the recording or reconstructing of the space that can be seen, the space inhabited by the artist’s body, and lastly the space enlivened by the presence of onlookers.

With works by:
Eija-Liisa Ahtila, Judith Albert, Francis Alÿs, Emmanuelle Antille, René Bauermeister, Dara Birnbaum, Paul Chan, Silvie & Chérif Defraoui, VALIE EXPORT, Dan Graham, Joan Jonas, Kim Sooja, Ana Mendieta, Bruce Nauman, Jean Otth, Nam June Paik, Anne-Julie Raccoursier, Pipilotti Rist, Anri Sala, Gerry Schum, Richard Serra, Salla Tykkä, Bill Viola
Photo: Nam June Paik, Global Groove, 1973 (video still). Musée cantonal des Beaux-Arts de Lausanne. Acquisition 2013. Courtesy Studio Nam June Paik and EAI, New York

  • October 18, 2013–January 5, 2014
MIT List Visual Arts Centercurated by João RibasChris Marker: Guillaume-en-Égyptephoto: Icarus Films
With an unparalleled and uncompromising career that spanned nearly six decades, Chris Marker (1921–2012) stands as a unique chronicler of the second half of the 20th century. A writer, editor, photographer, filmmaker, and multimedia artist,Marker was born Christian François Bouche-Villeneuve in Neiully-sur-Seine, France, in 1921. Throughout his multifaceted life—from fighting with the French resistance to becoming an early adopter of digital technologies—Marker employed a variety of media in his investigation of the relationship between images, memory, and history. While perhaps best known for his radical 1962 sci-fi film La jetée, Marker worked as a writer and editor before turning to photography and film in the 1950s, and then to video and new media in later decades, producing over fifty films and multimedia works before his death in Paris in 2012. Chris Marker: Guillaume-en-Égypte, presents the first comprehensive exhibition of the renowned filmmaker and artist, surveying his pioneering work in writing, photography, film, video, and digital media.Marker’s early photographic work was produced after joining the Parisian intellectual circles of the 1940s, and publishing poems, fictions, editorials, and film criticism. This ensuing vast photographic output is comprised of images taken throughout the world since the 1940s.  Marker defined these travels—from postwar China, to eventually, the virtual worlds of Second Life—as part of an obsessive curiosity to capture “life in the process of becoming history.” Turning to filmmaking in the 1950s, the resulting films, television programs, and video works produced over the next fifty years made him one of the most innovative and influential filmmakers in modern cinema history. Heralded as the birth of a new genre, Lettre de Sibérie (Letter From Siberia, 1958), one of Marker’s earliest films, evinces the nearly unclassifiable combination of travelogue, documentary, essay, historical analysis, and humor that would come to define Marker’s cinematic output. Marker’s interest in moving image production and political engagement led him to establish filmmaking collectives in the 1960s that sought to make films in a collaborative way and to support workers in producing their own films. As an astute critic of the relation between images and history, Marker would consistently turn to new technologies to expand forms of independent moving image production. By the early 1990s, Marker was working extensively in video—allowing him unprecedented abilities in the manipulation of images—and was an early adopter of digital technology. The introduction of digital media to create, store, and distribute images and texts in the following decades expanded the production of new kinds of independent filmmaking, as well as furthered his investigation of the shifting conditions of the image. While Marker’s work from the 1990s reflected on the historical role of cinema, he also gestured towards its future, anticipating ways in which networks are increasingly sites of both personal and collective memory mediated through interfaces. Tracing the shifting conditions of the image through the technological innovations of the 20th and 21st century, Marker produced work for digital and online platforms through the late 1990s and 2000s. Marker’s use of such media speak to his commitment to exploring how new media technologies impact the processes of recording and interpreting history, and how digital technology is effecting the production and dissemination of images.
  • October 18, 2013–January 5, 2014
MIT List Visual Arts Centercurated by João RibasChris Marker: Guillaume-en-Égyptephoto: Icarus Films
With an unparalleled and uncompromising career that spanned nearly six decades, Chris Marker (1921–2012) stands as a unique chronicler of the second half of the 20th century. A writer, editor, photographer, filmmaker, and multimedia artist,Marker was born Christian François Bouche-Villeneuve in Neiully-sur-Seine, France, in 1921. Throughout his multifaceted life—from fighting with the French resistance to becoming an early adopter of digital technologies—Marker employed a variety of media in his investigation of the relationship between images, memory, and history. While perhaps best known for his radical 1962 sci-fi film La jetée, Marker worked as a writer and editor before turning to photography and film in the 1950s, and then to video and new media in later decades, producing over fifty films and multimedia works before his death in Paris in 2012. Chris Marker: Guillaume-en-Égypte, presents the first comprehensive exhibition of the renowned filmmaker and artist, surveying his pioneering work in writing, photography, film, video, and digital media.Marker’s early photographic work was produced after joining the Parisian intellectual circles of the 1940s, and publishing poems, fictions, editorials, and film criticism. This ensuing vast photographic output is comprised of images taken throughout the world since the 1940s.  Marker defined these travels—from postwar China, to eventually, the virtual worlds of Second Life—as part of an obsessive curiosity to capture “life in the process of becoming history.” Turning to filmmaking in the 1950s, the resulting films, television programs, and video works produced over the next fifty years made him one of the most innovative and influential filmmakers in modern cinema history. Heralded as the birth of a new genre, Lettre de Sibérie (Letter From Siberia, 1958), one of Marker’s earliest films, evinces the nearly unclassifiable combination of travelogue, documentary, essay, historical analysis, and humor that would come to define Marker’s cinematic output. Marker’s interest in moving image production and political engagement led him to establish filmmaking collectives in the 1960s that sought to make films in a collaborative way and to support workers in producing their own films. As an astute critic of the relation between images and history, Marker would consistently turn to new technologies to expand forms of independent moving image production. By the early 1990s, Marker was working extensively in video—allowing him unprecedented abilities in the manipulation of images—and was an early adopter of digital technology. The introduction of digital media to create, store, and distribute images and texts in the following decades expanded the production of new kinds of independent filmmaking, as well as furthered his investigation of the shifting conditions of the image. While Marker’s work from the 1990s reflected on the historical role of cinema, he also gestured towards its future, anticipating ways in which networks are increasingly sites of both personal and collective memory mediated through interfaces. Tracing the shifting conditions of the image through the technological innovations of the 20th and 21st century, Marker produced work for digital and online platforms through the late 1990s and 2000s. Marker’s use of such media speak to his commitment to exploring how new media technologies impact the processes of recording and interpreting history, and how digital technology is effecting the production and dissemination of images.

October 18, 2013–January 5, 2014

MIT List Visual Arts Center
curated by João Ribas
Chris Marker: Guillaume-en-Égypte
photo: Icarus Films

With an unparalleled and uncompromising career that spanned nearly six decades, Chris Marker (1921–2012) stands as a unique chronicler of the second half of the 20th century. A writer, editor, photographer, filmmaker, and multimedia artist,Marker was born Christian François Bouche-Villeneuve in Neiully-sur-Seine, France, in 1921. Throughout his multifaceted life—from fighting with the French resistance to becoming an early adopter of digital technologies—Marker employed a variety of media in his investigation of the relationship between images, memory, and history. While perhaps best known for his radical 1962 sci-fi film La jetée, Marker worked as a writer and editor before turning to photography and film in the 1950s, and then to video and new media in later decades, producing over fifty films and multimedia works before his death in Paris in 2012. Chris Marker: Guillaume-en-Égypte, presents the first comprehensive exhibition of the renowned filmmaker and artist, surveying his pioneering work in writing, photography, film, video, and digital media.

Marker’s early photographic work was produced after joining the Parisian intellectual circles of the 1940s, and publishing poems, fictions, editorials, and film criticism. This ensuing vast photographic output is comprised of images taken throughout the world since the 1940s.  Marker defined these travels—from postwar China, to eventually, the virtual worlds of Second Life—as part of an obsessive curiosity to capture “life in the process of becoming history.” Turning to filmmaking in the 1950s, the resulting films, television programs, and video works produced over the next fifty years made him one of the most innovative and influential filmmakers in modern cinema history. Heralded as the birth of a new genre, Lettre de Sibérie (Letter From Siberia, 1958), one of Marker’s earliest films, evinces the nearly unclassifiable combination of travelogue, documentary, essay, historical analysis, and humor that would come to define Marker’s cinematic output. 

Marker’s interest in moving image production and political engagement led him to establish filmmaking collectives in the 1960s that sought to make films in a collaborative way and to support workers in producing their own films. As an astute critic of the relation between images and history, Marker would consistently turn to new technologies to expand forms of independent moving image production. By the early 1990s, Marker was working extensively in video—allowing him unprecedented abilities in the manipulation of images—and was an early adopter of digital technology. The introduction of digital media to create, store, and distribute images and texts in the following decades expanded the production of new kinds of independent filmmaking, as well as furthered his investigation of the shifting conditions of the image. 

While Marker’s work from the 1990s reflected on the historical role of cinema, he also gestured towards its future, anticipating ways in which networks are increasingly sites of both personal and collective memory mediated through interfaces. Tracing the shifting conditions of the image through the technological innovations of the 20th and 21st century, Marker produced work for digital and online platforms through the late 1990s and 2000s. Marker’s use of such media speak to his commitment to exploring how new media technologies impact the processes of recording and interpreting history, and how digital technology is effecting the production and dissemination of images.



24 September–15 December 2013 Ana Mendieta: TracesHayward Gallery, Southbank CentreBelvedere Road, London SE1 8XX
One of the focal points of the exhibition will be the re-construction of two significant solo exhibitions from the artist’s lifetime, including her main body of works, “Siluetas.” The extensive and fascinating archive material will shed new light on the way the artist worked and documented her own artistic practice. Featuring super-8 films, photographs, slides, drawings, prints, objects and sculptures, Ana Mendieta: Traces will not only follow a chronology, but will look at the artist’s entire oeuvre through the lens of her own time, bringing it afresh to the beginning of the 21st century. The exhibition focuses both on the incredible power of the artist’s imagery as well as her critical potential and importance for feminism, and land art.

24 September–15 December 2013 
Ana Mendieta: Traces
Hayward Gallery, Southbank Centre
Belvedere Road, London SE1 8XX

One of the focal points of the exhibition will be the re-construction of two significant solo exhibitions from the artist’s lifetime, including her main body of works, “Siluetas.” The extensive and fascinating archive material will shed new light on the way the artist worked and documented her own artistic practice. Featuring super-8 films, photographs, slides, drawings, prints, objects and sculptures, Ana Mendieta: Traces will not only follow a chronology, but will look at the artist’s entire oeuvre through the lens of her own time, bringing it afresh to the beginning of the 21st century. The exhibition focuses both on the incredible power of the artist’s imagery as well as her critical potential and importance for feminism, and land art.

  • Thursday, July 18 at 9pm and Saturday, July 20 at 2pm"Thingification"New YorkDuriel E. Harris
A one-woman show combining poetry, performance, music, & dance to invigorate audiences with the transformative energy of wordsoundpower.
"The term "thing-ification" originates in Discourse on Colonialism by Aimé Césaire, where he explains that colonization diminishes the humanity of both colonizer and colonized. There he states: colonization = thing-ification.Understanding that all oppressions are linked, I offer my one-woman show as one way to restore ourselves, celebrating our collective human potential.”
  • Thursday, July 18 at 9pm and Saturday, July 20 at 2pm"Thingification"New YorkDuriel E. Harris
A one-woman show combining poetry, performance, music, & dance to invigorate audiences with the transformative energy of wordsoundpower.
"The term "thing-ification" originates in Discourse on Colonialism by Aimé Césaire, where he explains that colonization diminishes the humanity of both colonizer and colonized. There he states: colonization = thing-ification.Understanding that all oppressions are linked, I offer my one-woman show as one way to restore ourselves, celebrating our collective human potential.”

Thursday, July 18 at 9pm and Saturday, July 20 at 2pm
"Thingification"
New York
Duriel E. Harris

A one-woman show combining poetry, performance, music, & dance to invigorate audiences with the transformative energy of wordsoundpower.

"The term "thing-ification" originates in Discourse on Colonialism by Aimé Césaire, where he explains that colonization diminishes the humanity of both colonizer and colonized. There he states: colonization = thing-ification.Understanding that all oppressions are linked, I offer my one-woman show as one way to restore ourselves, celebrating our collective human potential.”

ALFREDO JAAR WILL REPRESENT CHILE AT VENICE BIENNALE 2013

fuckyeahnicolasjaar:

art of Alfredo Jaar is definitelly worth to explore